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Week 6: Section 2: Lesson 4: Becoming the Change

  • 1.  Week 6: Section 2: Lesson 4: Becoming the Change

    Posted 8 days ago
    Hello everyone!

    In week 6 of the Pathway of the Quarter: Change Agility we are taught how to become the change. I have to say I'm excited for the readings this week! We have 2 articles to complete, which I'd say total time would be about 10 minutes or less to complete.

    Don't forget to mark your items complete in the pathway to get credit! I'll be back Wednesday to start our weekly discussions.

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    Laura Gibbs
    CUES
    Online Community Engagement Administrator
    laurag@cues.org
    608.288.5352
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  • 2.  RE: Week 6: Section 2: Lesson 4: Becoming the Change

    Posted 6 days ago
    It is the leader's responsibility to ensure change is properly communicated throughout the organization. To be able to fully communicate change, one must be the first to adapt. Think back to a time in which you were on the forefront of change and had to grasp on from the get-go. In order to roll the change out, you most likely had a clear vision of the who, what, when, where, and how. How did you communicate this change to others? Were you clear and concise? Did you provide all the necessary information? Did you provide too much information? Were you there to help other through the change process?

    One common theme I am seeing throughout this pathway is how important communication is during change. In a previous post, (NAME) mentioned that he typically overshares info. I think for some to adapt to change all the info is needed, and for others, just the basics are needed - When is it happening? How is it affecting me? What is my role? I think I am more of the latter - tell me what I need to know and I'm good.

    This week's lesson mentioned letting people know what is staying the same. This is so important, and I think often overlooked. Change is scary in any situation - if you know what is staying the same, maybe the resistance level will lower.

    I have found that some changes are fun and exciting, and you find less resistance in those instances. Whereas the not so fun changes, resistance is high.

    Have you considered approaching changes with what is staying the same first? Do you think this would help resistance?

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    Laura Gibbs
    CUES
    Online Community Engagement Administrator
    laurag@cues.org
    608.288.5352
    ------------------------------